Book Review: Of Literature & Lattes by Katherine Reay

In a follow up to The Printed Letter Bookshop (reviewed here), comes Katherine Reay’s new release, Of Literature & Lattes. I’m part of a Facebook group that Reay is one of the moderators on and I read A LOT of praise for this title prior to getting my hands on a copy. In full disclosure, I started the draft of this review a couple months ago and just found it dusty and with not much more than the opening sentences. Whoops!

What I remember of this title is that it was worth a blog post – it was sweet with small town charm, a cast of endearing supporting characters, and a heartwarming romance. It was easy to read as a stand alone title, but has some familiarity for those who read The Printed Letter Bookshop. Reay creates an easy-to-read enjoyable “everyday” novel – not that it’s mundane, but the plot lines aren’t completely unbelievable and us normal folk can often relate to the struggles and challenges the characters face. Overall, I’d recommend this one. It’s a cozy, slow paced, easy read that’ll leave you with a happy sigh by the final chapter – second chances for the win!

My thanks to Thomas Nelson for a complimentary copy of this title that I received via NetGalley. It was published May 12, 2020 and should be available from your favourite bookseller!

Book Review: The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay

…(a) descriptive and endearing narrative on the struggles of life and treasures of friendship

I am so far behind in my NetGalley book reviews… but I’ve been choosing sleep instead of reading in an effort to improve my health. The sacrifice has not yet been worth it – just sayin’.

One of the books I completed a some days ago and thought deserving of a full-fledged review was “The Printed Letter Bookshop.” It’s a Thomas Nelson title – so fairly wholesome, although the characters definitely have their issues. It focuses on a determined young lawyer who inherits her aunt’s bookshop, and the two local women who assist in the shop – a divorcee, and a do-it-all mom.

Through personality clashes, obvious character flaws, family secrets, and a good deal of “searching” I would classify this as a novel of growth, with a dash of sweet romance. It was probably a pleasure to read because of the main feature – the charming little bookshop – a delight for readers who dream of an actual day-to-day connection with books (i.e. me…) just inhaling the scent and discovering new pieces of printed wonder. It’s a testament to the impact one individual can make. It’s a story of hope and new beginnings.

I’ve not read Katherine Reay before this NetGalley copy provided in exchange for my opinion, but I have most definitely added other titles to my to-read list. This was a delightful, easy-to-read, descriptive and endearing narrative on the struggles of life and treasures of friendship. This title was published May 14th – so go pick up a copy from your local independent bookseller (or Amazon if all else fails…)